Traditions & Service2018-02-23T15:17:21+00:00

Texas A&M University is perhaps best known for its rich traditions. You can support Texas A&M traditions with a gift to the Student Activities Traditions and Service Endowment. This fund is designed to cover and/or offset expenses related to the planning and implementation of student-led unifying events that perpetuate the great traditions of Texas A&M, such as Muster, the Big Event, the Bonfire Memorial and many more. Private funding is critical to keep these traditions alive for years to come.

Male yell leader cheering on a crowdAggie Yell Leaders attend all home and away football games, as well as all home basketball, volleyball and soccer games. They can always be found on the sidelines in front of the student section, encouraging the crowd to show their Aggie spirit.

NEED: You may support our Aggie Yell Leaders by creating a custom major gift or donating online at give.am/SupportYellLeader.

Two students touching lit candles togetherMuster is the Texas A&M tradition that forever unites the Aggie past and present. It was first held on June 26, 1883, when former students of Texas A&M gathered together to “…live over again our college days, the victories and defeats won and lost upon drill ground and classroom. Let every alumnus answer a roll.” Each year on April 21, Aggies gather at locations worldwide to celebrate Texas A&M’s most solemn and sacred tradition in remembrance of Aggies who have fallen during the past year.

NEED: You may support this time-honored Aggie tradition by creating a custom major gift or donating online at give.am/SupportAggieMuster.

African American male student carry bags of mulch for BIG eventSince its introduction in 1982, The Big Event has become the largest, one-day, student-run service project in the nation. Each spring, tens of thousands of Texas A&M students come together to say “thank you” to Bryan-College Station residents. Aggie students show their appreciation to the surrounding community by completing service projects such as yard work, window washing and painting.

NEED: As The Big Event continues to expand in size and scope, the need for private support grows, as well. Give online at give.am/SupportBigEvent or consider funding a major gift that would more substantially advance the program.

young boy stands up in football crowd cheering on teamEvery season, one football game is declared a “Maroon Out,” in which Aggie fans are encouraged to purchase and wear a maroon shirt designed specifically for that game. The tradition of Maroon Out started in 1998 at the Texas A&M/Nebraska game, when Aggies overpowered the many Nebraska fans clad in red. Class Councils now sell more than 45,000 Maroon Out shirts each year. All proceeds benefit Class Councils, the respective Class Gift Funds, the Aggie Ring for Veterans Fund and Maroon Out Scholarships.

NEED:  Your gift to the Maroon Out program will provide operational funds, reduce student t-shirt costs, and grow the program for future Aggie fans.

Yell leader in demin overalls cheers on a crowd of studentsThe night before every home football game, Aggies hold Midnight Yell at Kyle Field. Midnight Yell begins as Yell Leaders lead the Fightin’ Texas Aggie Band and current and former students into the stadium. Once inside, the crowd joins in yells dating back
to Texas A&M’s earliest days. The crowd later sings The Aggie War Hymn and listens
to fables and jokes that illustrate how the Aggies will beat their opponent on the field
the next day.

NEED:  A named endowment to support this revered Aggie tradition would enhance the Midnight Yell experience and ensure its future prominence among students.

white stone structure on a green grass fieldThis solemn structure celebrates the history, tradition and spirit of Texas A&M’s Bonfire, a symbol of every Aggie’s burning desire to beat the University of Texas (now any opponent) in football. At 2:42 a.m. on November 18, 1999, the bonfire stack collapsed, killing 12 Aggies and injuring 27 others. The Bonfire Memorial honors those who died on that tragic night. Twelve portals, each facing the direction of the students’ hometowns, surround the site.

NEED:  An endowed gift would ensure enhancements and upkeep to the Bonfire Memorial for future Aggies.

Learn more about opportunities to help students reach their full potential through the Lead By Example campaign.